Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Dawkins'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Dailyflix Community
    • General Discussion & Announcements
    • Help & Guidelines
    • Critics Corner
    • Dumpster
    • Forum Games
    • Creative Content
    • The Underground
  • Movies
    • Discuss Movies
    • PreRetail Flix
    • DivX Movies
    • HD (High Definition) Movies
    • MicroHD Movies
    • H264 / H265 Movies
    • Flash Movies
    • Shorts and FanEdit Movies
    • Movie Requests
  • The Direct Flix
  • TV Shows
    • Discuss TV Shows
    • General TV
    • Reality TV, Talk Shows and Award Shows
    • Comedy
    • Sci-Fi / Fantasy / Horror
    • Cartoons (adult-oriented animated sitcoms)
    • Kids TV Shows and Cartoons
    • TV Mini-Series
    • TV Show Requests
  • Foreign Movies, Documentaries & TV Shows
    • Foreign Movie / TV / Documentary Discussion
    • Foreign Movies
    • Foreign TV Shows
    • Foreign Documentaries
    • Bollywood Movies
    • Anime Movies & TV Shows
  • Documentaries
    • Documentaries
  • Stand Up Comedy
    • Stand Up Comedy
  • Internet Café
    • Internet Café
  • E-Cig Forum
    • E-Cig Forum (Vaping)
  • The Library
    • Audio Books / eBooks / eComics
  • Music
    • Music
  • Sports, Health & Fitness
    • Sports
    • Health & Fitness
  • Archive
    • Archive

Found 4 results

  1. Ideas about the soul and the afterlife, of sin and God's purpose have shaped human thinking for thousands of years. Religious rituals remain embedded in the major events of our lives. In this thought-provoking series, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins asks what happens if we leave religion behind. He explores what reason and science might offer to inspire and guide our lives in religion's place. Can science bring understanding in the face of death, help us tell right from wrong, or reveal the meaning of life? Episode 1 If there is no God watching us, why be good? Richard Dawkins examines sin. He asks whether the old religious rules about what is right and wrong are helpful and explores what science can tell us about how to be good. Dawkins journeys from riot-torn inner city London to America's Bible Belt, building a powerful argument that religion's absolutist moral codes fuel lies and guilt. He finds the most extreme example in a Paris plastic surgery clinic that specialises in making Muslim brides appear to be virgins once again. But what can science and reason tell us about morality? Through encounters with lemurs, tango dancers, the gay rights campaigner Matthew Parris and the scientist Steven Pinker, Dawkins investigates the deeper roots of moral behaviour in our evolutionary past. He explores the rituals that surround mating and the science of disgust and taboo. Drawing on crime data and insights from neuroscience, he argues that our evolved senses of reason and empathy appear to be making us more and more moral, even as religious observance declines. HD Episode 2 Richard Dawkins explores what science can tell us about death. It's a journey that takes him from Hindu funeral pyres in India to genetics labs in New York. Dawkins brings together the latest neuroscience, evolutionary and genetic theory to examine why we crave life after death, why we evolved to age and how the human genome is something like real immortality - traits inherited from our distant ancestors that we pass on to future generations. He meets a Christian dying of motor neurone disease, reminisces about the Wall Street Crash with a 105-year-old stockbroker, and interviews James Watson, the geneticist who co-discovered the structure of DNA. Dawkins admits to sentimentality in imagining his own church funeral, but he argues we must embrace the truth, however hard that is. In a television first, he has his entire genome sequenced to reveal the genetic indicators of how he himself may die. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEclvp40KHU
  2. Richard Dawkins has an opinion on everything biological, it seems, and in A Devil's Chaplain, everything is biological. Dawkins weighs in on topics as diverse as ape rights, jury trials, religion, and education, all examined through the lens of natural selection and evolution. Although many of these essays have been published elsewhere, this book is something of a greatest-hits compilation, reprinting many of Dawkins' most famous recent compositions. They are well worth re-reading. His 1998 review of Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont's Fashionable Nonsense is as bracing an indictment of academic obscurantism as the book it covered, although the review reveals some of Dawkins' personal biases as well. Several essays are devoted to skillfully debunking religion and mysticism, and these are likely to raise the hackles of even casual believers. Science, and more specifically evolutionary science, underlies each essay, giving readers a glimpse into the last several years' debates about the minutiae of natural selection. In one moving piece, Dawkins reflects on his late rival Stephen Jay Gould's magnum opus, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory, and clarifies what it was the two Darwinist heavyweights actually disagreed about. While the collection showcases Dawkins' brilliance and intellectual sparkle, it brings up as many questions as it answers. As an ever-ardent champion of science, honest discourse, and rational debate, Dawkins will obviously relish the challenge of answering them. PDF http://turbobit.net/cwyf9hctx0a2.html http://depositfiles.com/files/nr37yoh2v
  3. Inheriting the mantle of revolutionary biologist from Darwin, Watson, and Crick, Richard Dawkins forced an enormous change in the way we see ourselves and the world with the publication of The Selfish Gene. Suppose, instead of thinking about organisms using genes to reproduce themselves, as we had since Mendel's work was rediscovered, we turn it around and imagine that "our" genes build and maintain us in order to make more genes. That simple reversal seems to answer many puzzlers which had stumped scientists for years, and we haven't thought of evolution in the same way since. http://www.filesonic.com/file/141475341/Selfish_Gene,_The_-_Richard_Dawkins.mobi http://www.filesonic.com/file/141474161/Selfish_Gene,_The_-_Richard_Dawkins.epub
  4. Just as we trace our personal family trees from parents to grandparents and so on back in time, so in The Ancestor's Tale Richard Dawkins traces the ancestry of life. As he is at pains to point out, this is very much our human tale, our ancestry. Surprisingly, it is one that many otherwise literate people are largely unaware of. Hopefully Dawkins's name and well deserved reputation as a best selling writer will introduce them to this wonderful saga. The Ancestor's Tale takes us from our immediate human ancestors back through what he calls ‘concestors,’ those shared with the apes, monkeys and other mammals and other vertebrates and beyond to the dim and distant microbial beginnings of life some 4 billion years ago. It is a remarkable story which is still very much in the process of being uncovered. And, of course from a scientist of Dawkins stature and reputation we get an insider's knowledge of the most up-to-date science and many of those involved in the research. And, as we have come to expect of Dawkins, it is told with a passionate commitment to scientific veracity and a nose for a good story. Dawkins's knowledge of the vast and wonderful sweep of life's diversity is admirable. Not only does it encompass the most interesting living representatives of so many groups of organisms but also the important and informative fossil ones, many of which have only been found in recent years. Dawkins sees his journey with its reverse chronology as ‘cast in the form of an epic pilgrimage from the present to the past [and] all roads lead to the origin of life.’ It is, to my mind, a sensible and perfectly acceptable approach although some might complain about going against the grain of evolution. The great benefit for the general reader is that it begins with the more familiar present and the animals nearest and dearest to us—our immediate human ancestors. And then it delves back into the more remote and less familiar past with its droves of lesser known and extinct fossil forms. The whole pilgrimage is divided into 40 tales, each based around a group of organisms and discusses their role in the overall story. Genetic, morphological and fossil evidence is all taken into account and illustrated with a wealth of photos and drawings of living and fossils forms, evolutionary and distributional charts and maps through time, providing a visual compliment and complement to the text. The design also allows Dawkins to make numerous running comments and characteristic asides. There are also numerous references and a good index. PDF http://rapidshare.com/files/56156150/Richard_Dawkins_The_Ancestor_s_Tale.rar Epub http://www.wupload.com/file/204405158/The%20Ancestor's%20Tale_%20A%20Pilgrimage%20to%20the%20-%20Richard%20Dawkins.epub http://www.filesonic.com/file/2139138581/The%20Ancestor's%20Tale_%20A%20Pilgrimage%20to%20the%20-%20Richard%20Dawkins.epub Mobi http://www.wupload.com/file/204405162/The%20Ancestor's%20Tale_%20A%20Pilgrimage%20to%20the%20-%20Richard%20Dawkins.mobi http://www.filesonic.com/file/2139138571/The%20Ancestor's%20Tale_%20A%20Pilgrimage%20to%20the%20-%20Richard%20Dawkins.mobi
×